Category Archives: ethical guidelines

Ethical guidelines for a counsellor are essential. All counsellor will adhere to an ethical framework. It is important that clients ensure their counsellor follow an ethical guideline. I adhere to BACP ethical framework. These articles all look at ethical issues.

Changes in Counselling Profession

I have seen various developments and changes within counselling profession over the last 15 years. More courses are available, British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) membership has vastly increased and more counsellors are becoming private practitioners.  Counsellors and organisations have to market themselves and approach their counselling work with a business head. Online Continue reading

Writing Clinical Will as a Counsellor

Guilty of putting off writing a clinical will

Writing Clinical will as a counsellorCreating and writing a clinical will has been something I’ve always intended to write but never got round to doing it.  Every week, I’m guilty of always transferring ‘writing my clinical will’ onto my weekly ‘to do’ list. However, a colleague, Roslyn Blyfield, Continue reading

Counselling Journey

Client’s Counselling Journey

counselling journeyThe majority of clients who approach me to enquire about my services have not engaged with a counsellor before. They are unsure about the counselling process and what counselling involves. I thought it would be useful to share Continue reading

Online Counselling ‘fits’ round you

 

I have been delivering counselling via Skype, email and instant chat for over two years. I was therefore recently asked by welldoing.org to write an article for their website on online counselling. They asked me to describe how online counselling can fit round busy clients, give some tips with a brief fictional case study to show how online counselling chat can work. This is a reproduction of this article. Continue reading

Counselling Supervision

Counselling supervisionWhen my previous counselling supervisor retired, it took a long time for me to find a new one. I finally found a new counselling supervisor that I did connect with and one I was able to be myself. I’ve had a great couple of years with her so I was therefore disappointed to hear that she too is retiring. Unfortunately as I had a poor experience during my training during my counselling supervision leaving me being cautious with whom I choose.  However, as I look for a new one it does feel new opportunity to help me gain a different perspective on my work, as well as start a new relationship with a different colleague.

I am about to start a counselling Supervision course and with me looking for a new supervisor, I thought it would be a good opportunity to reflect on what is counselling supervision and what is it that I am looking for. Continue reading

Self-disclosure of a counsellor

self disclosure of counsellorsIn order for a counsellor to remain focused on the client, self-disclosure during a session is not encouraged. Self-disclosure is sharing information with your client that they would not know about you. It is generally felt that self-disclosure of a counsellor may get in the way of the client’s journey. The counsellor’s past and issues, if disclosed to a client, may ruin the trust between the counsellor and the client or it may influence the client in their decision making.

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Boundaries in counselling

boundaries in counsellingWith the recent report of two therapists being abused by another counsellor in a counselling relationship, I can imagine it has made people wonder if they are safe with their present therapist. It could also make potential clients wonder how to ensure that their therapist will not take advantage of them. It was clear in this case that the boundaries in counselling were broken. The topic does open the debate of whether the professional organisations, such as British Association of Counselling (BACP), should be regulated to ensure all clients are protected in counselling. At the moment regulation appears to be not on the immediate agenda. It is therefore important for us therapists and counsellors to ensure that our clients are fully aware of what to expect from us.

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